Invasive Knotweed Control - Pesticide Use Permit

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The City of Abbotsford is pursuing a Pesticide Use Permit from the Province in order to control invasive knotweeds sites of concern located at drainage ditches, canals/sloughs, and creeks/streams within Abbotsford managed areas.

Knotweed species are an extremely aggressive invasive plant with a very large and deep root system. This plant has invaded drainage ditches, canals and sloughs, creeks and streams, amongst other areas within Abbotsford. Knotweed does not have any natural predators that keep its size in check. It can reproduce by seed, but it is most often seen to spread by plant fragments – this allows knotweed to grow very densely, very quickly taking over an area and crowding out all other vegetation. Along waterways, pieces of the plant can break off and be deposited downstream, creating new infestations very quickly.

Knotweed ExamplesKnotweed grows from its roots during early spring, and the new growth looks like red asparagus. It can grow up to 10 cm PER DAY, reaching up to 2 m tall during the summer. After the plant flowers in July/August, the knotweed will yellow as it begins to prepare for dormancy. The stems then die back when the frost hits, leaving dried stalks that stay at the site over-winter, before starting this process all over again.

If you have any comments about this project, please fill in the form below.

The City of Abbotsford is pursuing a Pesticide Use Permit from the Province in order to control invasive knotweeds sites of concern located at drainage ditches, canals/sloughs, and creeks/streams within Abbotsford managed areas.

Knotweed species are an extremely aggressive invasive plant with a very large and deep root system. This plant has invaded drainage ditches, canals and sloughs, creeks and streams, amongst other areas within Abbotsford. Knotweed does not have any natural predators that keep its size in check. It can reproduce by seed, but it is most often seen to spread by plant fragments – this allows knotweed to grow very densely, very quickly taking over an area and crowding out all other vegetation. Along waterways, pieces of the plant can break off and be deposited downstream, creating new infestations very quickly.

Knotweed ExamplesKnotweed grows from its roots during early spring, and the new growth looks like red asparagus. It can grow up to 10 cm PER DAY, reaching up to 2 m tall during the summer. After the plant flowers in July/August, the knotweed will yellow as it begins to prepare for dormancy. The stems then die back when the frost hits, leaving dried stalks that stay at the site over-winter, before starting this process all over again.

If you have any comments about this project, please fill in the form below.